Quiz: Reform of the House of Lords

Lord Norton

On Thursday, the House debated a report from the Labour Peers Working Group on Reform of the House of Lords.  You can read the debate hereThe quiz covers various reforms of the House.  The first reader to supply the correct answer will win one of my recent publications.  Jonathan, the winner of the last quiz, received a copy of The Voice of the Backbenchers.

1. The first life peers were the law lords.  What Act created Lords of Appeal in Ordinary?

2. The Parliament Act 1911 provided for public bills to be enacted even if not passed by the House of Lords.  Section 2(1) of the Act excludes what type of bill from this provision?

3. The Life Peerages Act 1958 provided for life peers to be created.  Under the Act, all life peers have the same rank of peerage.  What is it?

4. Tony Benn, Quintin Hogg and Alec Douglas-Home were notable hereditary peers who disclaimed their titles under the Peerages Act 1963.  Name at least three others who disclaimed their peerages.

5. Following passage of the House of Lords Act 1999, former Leaders of the House who were hereditary peers were offered life peerages.  Only two are still alive and only one who is not on leave of absence.  Who is he?

6. The House now has Questions for Short Debate (QSDs).  By what name were they previously known?

 

12 comments for “Quiz: Reform of the House of Lords

  1. 20/06/2014 at 7:36 pm

    1. The Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876
    2. A Money Bill
    3. Baron
    4. Antony Lambton; Lord James Douglas-Hamilton (now Lord Selkirk of Douglas); both the 2nd and 3rd Lords Silkin (even though the latter was after 1999)
    5. Lord Carrington
    6. Unstarred question. I have to admit this is the one answer I didn’t know this time without recourse to Google. I did think it might be “dinner break debate”.

  2. 20/06/2014 at 8:04 pm

    1. The first life peers were the law lords. What Act created Lords of Appeal in Ordinary?
    Answer: the Appellate Jurisdiction Act of 1876
    2. The Parliament Act 1911 provided for public bills to be enacted even if not passed by the House of Lords. Section 2(1) of the Act excludes what type of bill from this provision?
    Answer: A Money Bill
    Or a Bill containing any provision to extend the maximum duration of Parliament beyond five years except under special provisions
    3. The Life Peerages Act 1958 provided for life peers to be created. Under the Act, all life peers have the same rank of peerage. What is it?
    Baron/Baroness
    4. Tony Benn, Quintin Hogg and Alec Douglas-Home were notable hereditary peers who disclaimed their titles under the Peerages Act 1963. Name at least three others who disclaimed their peerages.
    Answer: i.Sir Hugh Fraser, once 2d Baronet Allander,
    ii. Victor Montagu once 10th Earl of Sandwich,
    iii. Antony Claud Frederick Lambton, briefly Earl of Durham

    5. Following passage of the House of Lords Act 1999, former Leaders of the House who were hereditary peers were offered life peerages. Only two are still alive and only one who is not on leave of absence. Who is he?
    Robert Michael James Gascoyne-Cecil, 7th Marquess of Salisbury
    6. The House now has Questions for Short Debate (QSDs). By what name were they previously known?
    According to a certain Baron of Louth:
    “We also have what are termed Questions for Short Debate (QSDs). These used to be known as Unstarred Questions, but few people outside the House really understood what this meant, so the name was changed to reflect what they actually are.”

  3. Jonny
    20/06/2014 at 8:17 pm

    1. The Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876

    2 Money Bills or a Bill to extend the maximum duration of Parliament beyond five years.

    3 Baron/Baroness

    4 Anthony Lambton, Sir Hugh Fraser Bt., John Grigg

    5. The Marquess of Salisbury (or Baron Gascoyne-Cecil) is currently on leave of absence. Lord Carington sits in the Lords as a life peer (under the title Baron Carington of Upton).

    6 ‘Questions for Short Debate’ were formerly called ‘unstarred questions’.

  4. Ulysses
    20/06/2014 at 8:37 pm

    1. The Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876

    2. Money Bills and bills extending the maximum duration of Parliament beyond five years

    3. Baron

    4. The 10th Earl of Sandwich, the 3rd Viscount Camrose and the 6th Earl of Durham

    5. Lord Carrington

    6. Unstarred Questions

  5. 21/06/2014 at 8:14 am

    Surprisingly, no answers yet. Your regular correspondents must be on holiday! I can at least answer the easy question: life peers are barons.

  6. JH
    21/06/2014 at 3:42 pm

    A little late in the day this time but:

    1. The Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 created Lords of Appeal in Ordinary (and the 1887 Act granted them life tenure).

    2. A bill to extend the life of Parliament beyond five years.

    3. Baron

    4. Lord James Douglas-Hamilton (Earl of Selkirk), Anthony Lambton (Earl of Durham) and Alan Sanderson (Baron Sanderson of Ayot)

    5. Lord Carrington

    6. Unstarred questions

  7. RichR
    22/06/2014 at 9:43 am

    1. Appellate Jurisdiction Act, 1870
    2. An act extending a Parliament beyond 5 years
    3. Baron
    4. Arthur Silkin and Christopher Silkin (2nd and 3rd Barons Silkin) and Victor Montagu (10th Earl of Sandwich)
    5. Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede (Ponsonby of Roehampton); the other is the Marquess of Salisbury (Baron Gascoyne-Cecil)
    6. Unstarred Questions

  8. 23/06/2014 at 9:26 am

    Assuming my answers are correct, perhaps I should disclaim my prize in order to allow someone else to enjoy one of Lord Norton’s excellent books. Maybe it’s time for me to take leave of absence from the quiz!

    • Lord Norton
      24/06/2014 at 10:34 am

      Jonathan: No need to take a break. As you will see in a moment, you are not this week’s winner!

  9. Lord Norton
    24/06/2014 at 11:08 am

    Questions 2 and 5 caught some readers out. The answers to the other questions were more straightforward.

    1. Lords of Appeal in Ordinary (law lords) were created under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876.

    2. Section 2(1) of the 1911 Parliament Act refers to Money Bills and Bills to extend the life of a Parliament. Other provisions of the Act catch Money Bills so that they are enacted even if not passed by the House of Lords. The answer to the question is thus Bills to extend the life of a Parliament.

    3. All life peers have the rank of Baron (or Baroness).

    4. There is a reasonable list from which to select in terms of hereditary peers who have renounced their titles. All those listed by contributors are correct. As indicated, they include the Silkins as well as Anthony Lambton (Earl of Durham) and Lord James Douglas-Hamilton (Earl of Selkirk), who is now in the Lords as a life peer.

    5. The remaining former Leader of the House who is a hereditary peer and is not on leave of absence is Lord Carrington. The Marquess of Salisbury has been on leave of absence for just over a decade.

    6. Questions for Short Debate were previously known as Unstarred Questions, thus distinguishing them from Starred Questions, which were the oral questions put at Question Time.

    Jonathan, the first person to respond, got five out of the six correct, but was caught out by Question 2. FrankSummers3ba opted for the Marquess of Salisbury instead of Lord Carrington. Also, his answer to Q2 was not confined to Bills to extend the life of a Parliament. Being strict, that also rules out Jonny and Ulysses, who could be described as getting five-and-a-half out of six. The first person to score a perfect six was therefore JH. He is the winner. If he would like to get in touch, his prize will be in the mail.

    • 24/06/2014 at 3:46 pm

      Lord Norton,

      So in the event my source for question six was reliable I suppose?

      • Lord Norton
        26/06/2014 at 9:39 am

        franksummers3ba: Your answer to question 6 was probably the most rigorously researched and authoritatively supported that we have had in the quiz. It may give me ideas for future questions!

Comments are closed.