Parliament Square squared

Lord Tyler

For those who had a look at my last post (All Square?), I was very glad to have some support from comments here, as well as from other Peers who spoke.

However, the most encouraging reaction was from my Liberal Democrat colleague, Lord (William) Wallace of Saltaire, the Minister replying to the debate.  By happy accident he had previously supported the effective pedestrianisation of the central area of the square, removing the traffic on two sides.  It was difficult, therefore, for him to be defeatist or obstructive to my ideas for making it a more demonstrably democratic space.
 
I suspect this issue is now heading back to the top of somebody’s list.  If you have any views, please do comment and I’ll make sure that they get passed on in due course to any decision-makers who put their heads above the parapet.

PS:  For those who took an interest in the other issues I was addressing last week – electoral registration and encouraging electoral participation – I warmly recommend the fascinating interview between Iain Dale and my colleague Chris Rennard, which is available at: http://www.totalpolitics.com/articles/160427/in-conversation-with-chris-rennard.thtml

4 comments for “Parliament Square squared

  1. MilesJSD
    milesjsd
    13/06/2011 at 7:38 pm

    Iain Dale states “You and I both know that most MPs do work bloody hard”;

    however, Chris Rennard’s response clearly shows that he thinks most MPs could work harder.

    Perhaps much depends upon “what you mean by _ _ _ ”

    I am minded of a workshop scenario illustrating the contrasting-distinction between Management and Leadership:

    the Manager takes his powerfully-equipped team of Loggers into a Jungle to ‘harvest’ huge quantities of Trees and immediately sets to work with armies of chainsaws

    meanwhile the Leader has been left all alone to check the map-references and so forth, by climbing the highest tree on the highest ground, and has seen something both Workers and Management had never suspected, and calls out through his loudspeaker

    “Wrong Jungle !”

    to which comes a chorus of replies
    “Shaddap, we’re already beating our Target”.

    (or words to that effect)

    1937M1306

  2. Twm
    15/06/2011 at 6:44 am

    Closing it on two sides may seem a good idea,
    Supreme court/Abbey sides, but it is far,far more complex than that.

    The highly scientific discipline of traffic flows, and management.

    If you close it on two sides you have then got a T junction!

    If you can build and use an effective channel tunnel, you can also build OVER the river, otherwise the traditional views of the Abbey and the Palace of Westminster are completely lost.

    Building UNDER or over the square and roads, would be such minutious nitpicking, as to be quite impossible.

    The best solution would be to move parliament to the Yorkshire moors, and start again. That idea has a lot of support, on the grounds of economy as well!

    Milesjsd sounds as though he has never been to Parliament Sq, and he has plenty of suggestions to put forward, so there is no shortage of ideas.

    • maude elwes
      15/06/2011 at 5:10 pm

      Parliament Square should be left alone, other than to remove the obvious over the top security we now have. Soon it will be as Grosvenor Square currently is, like its been taken over by aliens. Mayfair has no resemblance to the village it once was felt to be.

      Not to mention the aliens that have invaded this once pretty Mayfair square, don’t pay the millions of pounds of traffic fines they have because they deem it a tax and they are, according to them, exempt from any tax levied. Odd how so many foreigners who live and work in the UK are tax free dwellers.

      Government is becoming less and less approachable and less reverred because of it.

      London is taking the brunt of that across the board. And sooner or later, tourism will be grossly affected by it.

  3. 15/06/2011 at 3:36 pm

    ‘It was difficult, therefore, for him to be defeatist or obstructive to my ideas for making it a more demonstrably democratic space.’
    It seems we have put ‘your friend’ in a rather tight bind….can you really expect an origional, thoughtfull responce from him when he has no space?
    Perhaps they will ceis to hide behind the parpets when the archers stand down.

    I’ll make sure that they get passed on in due course to any decision-makers who put their heads above the parapet.

    You must have a total belief in yourself, enough so to withdraw them from the parpet. If you fail to back your cause with everything, how can you expect they do likewise?

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