Andrew Marr and blogging

Lord Soley

Andrew Marr has apparently attacked bloggers claiming they are ‘inadequate ranters’. http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2010/oct/11/andrew-marr-bloggers

 Blogging does attract some people who can best described as sad, mad or bad and this is a problem but is traditional journalism really free of such sinners?

 Blogging adds to our information about the world we live in and gives people additional free expression. The difficulty lies in finding the blogs – and the comments on blogs – we think are most useful.

18 comments for “Andrew Marr and blogging

  1. baronessmurphy
    12/10/2010 at 10:55 am

    You must admit we’ve had a few that rather fit Andrew Marr’s description. I hope the ones that aren’t permanently angry will continue to conribute rather than feel scared off by the oddities.

    • 17/10/2010 at 8:23 pm

      Isn’t one of your duties to get to the bottom of why some people are “permanently angry” and to legislate progressively for their faster redress, rehabilititation and further-education ?

      2023Sn17

  2. djb13
    12/10/2010 at 12:07 pm

    Hitler would have said that blogging is for inadequate ranters.

    ^Irony

  3. Croft
    12/10/2010 at 12:35 pm

    The Total Politics rankings are pretty helpful and rather accurately reflect the blogs of all parties I read.

    The journalistic establishment has lost their monopoly on what news is reported, are suffering cutbacks, and are being forced to cover stories set by the blogs – mostly obviously Guido. Seriously someone pass me a hankie 😉

  4. Gareth Howell
    12/10/2010 at 12:53 pm

    “journalistic establishment has lost their monopoly on what news is reported”
    Croft speaks truth, in a way.

    The truth is that bloggers are a very convenient set of amateur Stringers, those who have always traditionally provided news to newspaper bylines.

    The professional stringer agencies must be laughing all the way to the bank, for the reduced effort required in collecting news/information about those in whom they are interested.

    Mr Marr, a byline/presenter, bites the hand that feeds him with the “gen”, and probably does so to put them in their proper place as unpaid servants of the professional news casters, news agencies, and news papers.

    In the old days the tobacco kiosk was the local ‘String’. Today it is the blogger as well. Some people still smoke…. and read news papers.

  5. Carl.H
    12/10/2010 at 4:34 pm

    Sad: Someone who is upset things are not right.

    Mad: Someone who is angry things are not right.

    Bad: Someone who is bloomin furious things are not right.

    I think that`s every reason anyone would want/need to become a journalist.

    Be it a blog or a column in a National Newspaper it is about personal opinion. Andrew Marr maybe correct that bloggers are inadequate, as is every losing party of an election, but surely there is none more inadequate than a political journalist who never can quite manage to run the Country or actually makes it into Parliament ?????

  6. Dave H
    12/10/2010 at 5:40 pm

    The advantage of blogging is that things can be circulated to a wider audience even when journalists, politicians and editors would rather they weren’t.

    When it comes to fighting the incompetence of some large corporations and government departments, once upon a time a complainant would be fobbed off and made to feel as if they were the only one with the problem. With the power of the internet and blogs, it is easy to discover all the other people who’ve been treated the same and go back en masse for proper redress.

    To Baroness Murphy – are you remarking on the bloggers who post the original material or the commenters who come along and respond? Is there even a difference, once a line is crossed and a wingnut is revealed?

    Blogs are useful, not only the ones that agree with your point of view, but the ones that don’t, because it gives some insight into how the other side thinks. I know Lord Soley has dabbled in the topic of home education, and is well up to speed on what a lot of us think 🙂

    Of course, the big danger is the wingnuts on your own team, where sometimes you might wish that they hadn’t said something because it’s perceived as damaging to the cause. Politics is not immune to this, some classic foot-in-mouth outbreaks have occurred.

    • Lord Blagger
      12/10/2010 at 11:29 pm

      When it comes to fighting the incompetence of some large corporations and government departments, once upon a time a complainant would be fobbed off and made to feel as if they were the only one with the problem. With the power of the internet and blogs, it is easy to discover all the other people who’ve been treated the same and go back en masse for proper redress.

      Almost. They can and do stick two fingers up to the people who pay them. The lords is a good example. Still no word on what the lords have been up to with our money that Michael Pownall has to make it a state secret, or perhaps he’s worried that he handed out millions for second homes, where as far as he’s concerned there is no second home.

      However, your general point is correct. Blogs enable the little man to make a fuss and communicate it.

      Here’s one example. HMRC forced people into Ltd companies because they didn’t like sole traders. Then the accountants moved in, and commoditised the process. The next jump was to umbrella companies to minimise the costs. However, one contractor tried it on with some expenses and it got passed the inspector. Next year all umbrella employee’s did the same. HMRC can’t appeal their own decisions, so it had to be a change in the law.

      It’s an example of a collective, against the state with transfer of information. The state has problems.

      ie. Look at all unions. Citizen versus state. Even unison.

      Next is surveillance. State watches us. Citizens will turn the tables. Record their conversations. Video the misbehaviour. Pull up hansard and put back the nonsense that goes on. Eg 1/7th of Lord Norton’s output is questions about the post room.

      What we need also is class actions. Class actions is one of the steps needed to bring the government to it’s heals and offer redress. ie. If parking isn’t illegal but people have been fined, the Local Authority needs to be forced to return the money. At the moment they steals it.

      Finally, in this day and age, if you want a representative to vote for you, it’s up to you to nominate one. If you want to vote for yourself, you should be able to as well.

  7. 12/10/2010 at 6:39 pm

    Marr’s comments reflect a fear not only of new technologies, but also of the erosion of privileges they encourage: http://bit.ly/bkYMd2

  8. ZAROVE
    12/10/2010 at 6:40 pm

    I wonder if the above referenced me. If so its so good I made my mark, though Im not angry, just not very willign ot let myself be called an irrational fool who needs someone else to tell me how to feel and what to think.

    That said, Blogging is like nay other text medium. It suffers from inexactness, becuse you dont hear the person speaking, so you can imagiune htem meaning somehtign that you’d know they didn’t if you heard them. Someone recently from this blog got my email address from another site and maiel dme, I told a bit of a joke and he mistook my meaning and so cut contact. I’ve had things like tat happen often. Then theres those who really will come about and be angry, but woudlnt be nearly so feirce in person, for the Internet allowed a good deal of annonymity and you dont look the peopel you speak to in the face, and its easy to imagine they arne’t people.

    But its also easy for hte blogger to contact vast swaths of people.

    So I’d say its like all else.

    As to me, nbecaue Im a religiosu person I have nothign to contribute to society anyway , so…

  9. Lord Soley
    Clive Soley
    13/10/2010 at 8:07 am

    Some interesting and thoughtful comments here. I think blogging is useful (I would wouldn’t I!!?) because it enables people to come into a discussion who previously were excluded by the main stream media. It also opens the field up to more information because there are more reporters.
    The fact that some comments are bizarre, excessivley long or just slightly dotty should not undermine the total value of the process.

    • Gareth Howell
      14/10/2010 at 10:07 am

      excessivley long or just slightly dotty should not undermine the total value of the process.

      Hang on! I object to that………………………………………..!

  10. 13/10/2010 at 11:42 am

    I think that if I was Lord Grumble I probably couldn’t be bothered to have a blog and engage with the populace. After all, if you are a lord you do have the opportunity to make your views known and even, perhaps, make things happen.

    So I think it is a real tribute to you blogging lordships that you are prepared to allow the ordinary man in the street to discuss things with you in an informal way here. I just hope that you are not like Dr Grumble –
    socially inadequate, pimpled, single, slightly seedy, bald, cauliflower-nosed, young men sitting in your mothers’ basements and ranting.

  11. 13/10/2010 at 12:06 pm

    Did anyone actually read Marr’s article?! His specific point is that bloggers are not journalists. He does attack them in the words quoted in the post, but he also says that much of what they do is great – but it isn’t journalism.

    • Gareth Howell
      13/10/2010 at 6:09 pm

      If parking isn’t illegal but people have been fined, the Local Authority needs to be forced to return the money. At the moment they steal it.

      Authorities will always have the power to do such things. Theft is a crime, but you will never beat city/town hall in to submission, nor, rarely, large corporations.

      but he also says that much of what they do is great – but it isn’t journalism.
      No it is known as “stringing news”, to the byline or editor, basically gossiping at a local level.

      The professional use what they want from the stringer, with or without payment.

      Jouralists use to smoke like chimneys but no more.

  12. Tim
    13/10/2010 at 5:51 pm

    As a general, non-political blogger, I am saddened by rather than angry with Marr’s comments.

    He responds to “angry, abusive and vituperative” citizen journalists with a series of knowingly inflammatory statements which are themselves angry, abusive and vituperative.

    Good God, have we reverted to the law of the playground? “He’s ugly, sir! And really angry! And I really, really hate him!”

    A shame, because the point he was making about the need for us to recognise the economic value of accurate, professional news gathering and dissemination is a valid one. Instead, we get this tawdry, headline-grabbing tar-everyone-with-the-same-brush blunderbuss approach.

    My thoughts – hopefully not too angry, abusive or vituperative …

    http://slouchingtowardsthatcham.com/2010/10/13/in-defence-of-bloggers-an-open-letter-to-andrew-marr/

  13. ladytizzy
    14/10/2010 at 4:03 pm
  14. baronessmurphy
    15/10/2010 at 10:14 am

    ladytizzy thanks so much for pointing that article out. It cheered me up….and also for similar reasons to Dr Grumble.

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