Peers leaving the House

Lord Norton

One of the principal provisions of the House of Lords Reform Act 2014 – a Private Member’s Bill steered through Parliament by Dan Byles MP and Lord Steel of Aikwood – was to enable peers to retire. Since its enactment, a good number have made use of the provision.  Several leading figures have retired in recent months, including the redoubtable Baroness Trumpington.  Others have included Lord Loyd-Webber, Lord Hattersley and the scientist Lord May of Oxford. Today sees the retirement of long-serving peer and former minister Lord Clinton-Davis.

Since the 2014 Act took effect, a total of 77 peers have retired.  Over the course of the past twelve months (10 Jan. 2017 – 10 Jan. 2018) 32 peers have left the House, either by death or retirement. Interestingly, a large majority (23) have been retirements.  Only nine peers have died, lower than is usually the case.

The House last month debated and welcomed the report of the Lord Speaker’s Group on the Size of the House (the Burns Committee).  There is much to be done to reduce the size of the House, but the 2014 Act has at least made a modest contribution.

3 comments for “Peers leaving the House

  1. 11/01/2018 at 12:07 am

    Why is the Constitution so inflexibly inaccessible _
    to be co-constructively up-dated
    and to be immediately brought “face-to-face” with The Real and Survival-Struggling World and especially our Peoples’ and Envireonments Sustain-worthily Working and Lifestyling People ?

    Why do we not vote for
    What We Need, publicly verbatim media-streamed ?
    – instead of for so many “sequestered” and “private” remote “Who” (mostly Lawyers and other PPPs – “privately-professional-profiteers”) ?

    Why,
    in the same People-Ripping-Off VV (vain-vein)
    are Members both called and empowered to self-seekingly act and “behave” as “Private Members” ?

    [Pause to seek-out more Peacefully-Revolutionary
    and Longest-Terfm Sustainworthy
    questions, please } – – –

  2. tory boy
    11/01/2018 at 10:56 am

    Baroness Sharples retired on 18/12 at the age of 94 after many years of service to the house. I’m sure she and Baroness Trumpington-the last two woman members to have served in an offical capacity during ww2 will be very much missed.

  3. Croft
    12/01/2018 at 12:41 pm

    “One of the principal provisions of the House of Lords Reform Act 2014 – a Private Member’s Bill steered through Parliament by Dan Byles MP and Lord Steel of Aikwood – was to enable peers to retire.”

    Peers could always retire by simply declining to attend. This might be a formal process but the practical different seems minimal at best.

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